MIT.nano: An Overview

In June, MIT will begin construction of a 200,000 square-foot nanoscale reserach building on the current Building 12 site. Dubbed "MIT.nano," the facility will house state-of-the-art cleanroom, imaging, and prototyping facilities supporting research on nanoscale materials and processes. With applications in a diverse array of fields including life sciences, electronics, and energy, MIT.nano "will keep MIT at the forefront of discovery and innovation, and give us the power to solve urgent global challenges," says MIT President L. Rafael Reif.

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2.009: An Iconic MIT Engineering Class

Taught by award-winning professor David Wallace, 2.009: Product Engineering Processes is a rigorous capstone class for undergraduates in the Mechanical Engineering program at MIT, bringing together everything students have learned along the way to develop a market-ready product together with a team of classmates.The final presentation is always a sold-out event, and teams often go on to start a company based on their products, or to sell their technology to another company. It is one of those iconic classes that those who take it never forget, an example of e

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Reif Releases Preliminary Report of the Institute-Wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education

Published by MIT News on November 21, 2013

President L. Rafael Reif has released the preliminary report of the Institute-Wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education — a document that, following months of engagement with the MIT community, presents a broad range of views on how MIT could recast itself to meet the educational needs of the coming decades.

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Tim the Beaver: MIT's Mascot

The beaver was chosen in 1914 as MIT's mascot because of its remarkable engineering and mechanical skill and its habits of industry. Since then TIM has affectionately been accepted as a pillar in the Institute community. Learn more about TIM: http://studentlife.mit.edu/cac/servic...

Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
Additional images courtesy of the MIT Museum
 

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A Good Ending to the Term

The MIT Faculty passed a resolution on Wednesday (May 15) setting the goal that each freshman would have a faculty advisor or mentor. This is a great goal. It responds to the data we have collected that our students want more faculty contact and that relative to our peers a smaller percentage of our students know three or more faculty well enough to write a letter of recommendation. This latter point also shows that we need to enhance faculty student interactions. 

Thoughts on Diversity

We are awaiting the Supreme Court decision on Fisher vs U of Texas. This might have a big impact on us. With so many applicants and such a rich set of backgrounds, we must do a holistic review of all applicants to look for the best fit to the rigorous, analytic environment that is MIT. Not only can we not do this by the numbers (SAT, GPA etc) but we are sure that they do not capture all that it takes to be successful at MIT. There is a quality of resilience that is essential to get through the challenges here.

A New Task Force on Education

The President of MIT, Rafael Reif, has announced a new task force on the MIT education of the future. It is exciting that MIT is taking the lead in trying to define how education here must change in light of both digital learning and all the financial pressures that we face. I applaud this move by the President. As we do this, we must think about all the issues of politics and culture that must be addressed in order for this to be successful.

Setting Tuition

The season of the academic year is approaching when we think about tuition. This has been the subject of much discussion in the press, some of it driven by political considerations. Different universities have to be responsive to various considerations including the number of students who can pay the full  tuition, the effect on public relations and competitiveness, the cost of delivering education at an acceptable level of quality and the internal rate of inflation for salaries and goods. This is a difficult balancing act.

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