Undergraduate Education News - All Years

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  • New MIT report takes a worldwide look at the future of how engineers are trained.

    A new report from MIT puts a spotlight on worldwide trends in the changing landscape of engineering education, pinpoints the current and emerging leaders in the field, and describes some of its future directions.

  • Autor, Capozzola, Raman, and Smith receive MIT's most prestigious undergraduate teaching award.

  • Devised and led by two MIT seniors, the x-terms pilot meshes academics with internships in the greater Boston area.

    Ali Abdalla’s path at MIT has been an unconventional one. Abdalla, a senior majoring in mechanical engineering, spent an entire year away from MIT doing two full-time internships. During the most recent one, from February through August, he worked with a design team at Tesla on high-voltage car components.

  • Data visualization map explores two decades of enrollment trends among female students at the Institute.

    A trio of researchers has created and published a data visualization map that examines trends in undergraduate gender diversity at MIT. The big reveal is heartening: Over the past 20 years, MIT’s female undergraduate population has risen to nearly 50 percent of total enrollment and such growth has been sustained across almost every department and school.

  • NEET pilot initiative centers around interdisciplinary projects to prepare students for the practice of engineering.

    Rose Wang loves to work on projects — especially ones that exceed the bounds of her declared majors, economics and computer science. She thrives on do-it-yourself design solutions. Her latest involves making an aerodynamic drone. “We’ll see how that goes,” she says.

  • Freeman will pilot first-year curriculum experiments; Staton to work closely with Waitz on graduate education.

    In a letter to the MIT community today, Chancellor Cynthia Barnhart announced she has appointed Ian A. Waitz to the newly created position of vice chancellor responsible for leading and integrating the offices for graduate and undergraduate education. In his new role, which begins July 1, Waitz will be working alongside students, faculty, and staff from across the Institute to enhance the student academic experience.

  • Faculty and students share their perspectives on the value of undergraduate research at “Pushing Boundaries” event.

    Question: What does building a 15th-century printing press have in common with using DNA to encode genetic memory in a cell?                                    

  • On February 1-2, The Teaching and Learning Lab (T+LL) partnered with ODL, DUE, and ODGE to host a campus-wide Festival of Learning. This 2-day event celebrated the creative contributions that MIT faculty, staff, and students have made to continuously improving student learning experiences at the Institute. In her opening remarks, Chancellor Cynthia Barnhart set the stage for the Festival and introduced the first keynote speaker, Satya Nitta of IBM Watson Education.

    In Nitta’s keynote address, titled “Watson and the Future of Learning Science and Technology,” he began with an historical overview of computing systems. He shared his perspective on the evolution of the field of artificial intelligence (AI), from its Minskian foundations in logic and reasoning to its current focus on intelligent tutoring systems through the implementation of statistical calculations and probabilistic answers. Nitta also quoted Daniel Denton, and stressed the fact that although AI systems can, in fact, learn, adapt, reason, analyze, and interpret, they are not intelligent. However, he did point out that by understanding how machines learn, we can gain insight into human learning.

    During the “Lighting Round,” MIT faculty and instructors presented short pedagogy talks that highlighted interesting and unique ways they engage students in active learning through the use of technology, project work, and interactive demonstrations. Materials Science professor Lorna Gibson discussed the evolution of her flipped 3.032x (Mechanical Behavior of Materials) class using MITx materials. Professor Michael Cuthbert demonstrated how he uses Artusi, an environment he developed for learning the rote, repetitive, but important skills of music fundamentals and music theory in his 21M.051 (Computer Tools for Music Fundamentals) class. Dean Dennis Freeman explained his use of task-centered instruction in 6.01 (Intro to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science) and described how he uses hands-on, lab-based activities to provide context for the introduction of relevant theory in subsequent lectures. Peter Dourmashkin described his use of the The Lightboard in 8.01 (Physics I), which allows the instructor to face front while writing. Professor Ely Sachs discussed the importance of teaching engineering students to be experts in both analysis and synthesis and his use of guided discovery to support the development of those capabilities...

  • A record number of MIT students studied in Madrid, Spain, during IAP 2017, earning credit towards their degree program. Sixty-one students enrolled in one of three course options: Global Literature, taught by Margery Resnick; Spanish II, taught by Ana Yanez Rodriguez; and Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition, taught by Margarita Ribas Groeger. The three courses offered students a chance to earn MIT credit, while living overseas in a homestay and gaining firsthand knowledge of another culture.

  • Editor's note: Mechanical engineering major and 3-year Momentum veteran Nenye Anagbogu '18 graciously agreed to share this insider's perspective on the experience.

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