DUE News - 2017

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  • The MIT Prison Initiative provides an academic framework for undergraduates and local inmates to explore the human condition.

    In 1987, while teaching a class at MIT on nonviolence, philosophy lecturer Lee Perlman had a novel idea: Why not take the students to a prison, to talk with men who had committed extreme forms of violence?

  • Student teams develop technology-based tools to address racism and bias.

    In July 2016, feeling frustrated about violence in the news and continued social and economic roadblocks to progress for minorities, members of the Black Alumni of MIT (BAMIT) were galvanized by a letter to the MIT community from President L. Rafael Reif. Responding to a recent series of tragic shootings, he asked “What are we to do?”

  • A new initiative developed by the Teaching and Learning Lab is designed to increase students’ sense of academic belonging.

    “Wait a minute… I’m the only female in this class!” realizes the engineering student in the cartoon, sandwiched beside her two male classmates. She shakes nervously, hands clenched, considering the responsibility of “representing all of womankind” before collapsing face-down on her desk. “Ditz” and “Psycho” thought bubbles appear above her smirking classmates’ heads.

  • “Life-changing.” That’s how Kevin Castro ’17 describes his experience with Concourse, one of MIT’s four freshman learning communities.

  • MIT teams innovating in medical, education, environmental, and other fields split prizes totaling $95,000.

    Ten MIT student teams developing innovations to improve the lives of people around the world split awards totaling $95,000 — including a top prize for an app that tackles the U.S. opioid epidemic — at the annual IDEAS Global Challenge showcase and awards ceremony.

  • Freeman will pilot first-year curriculum experiments; Staton to work closely with Waitz on graduate education.

    In a letter to the MIT community today, Chancellor Cynthia Barnhart announced she has appointed Ian A. Waitz to the newly created position of vice chancellor responsible for leading and integrating the offices for graduate and undergraduate education. In his new role, which begins July 1, Waitz will be working alongside students, faculty, and staff from across the Institute to enhance the student academic experience.

  • Sophomore researches fusion energy and promotes STEM opportunities for young women.

    When she was 16, Monica Pham mapped out her future. “My chemistry teacher was talking about how atoms could generate unlimited power,” Pham recalls. “I asked her what kind of person worked in this field, and when she said a nuclear engineer, I decided that’s what I wanted to be.”

  • The Black Women’s Alliance (BWA) surprised DiOnetta Jones Crayton recently by naming her as the first recipient of the BWA Ayida Mthembu Award. The award was created to honor Mthembu’s service to MIT and the BWA.

  • “Make it Happen” was the theme of MIT’s Spring Career Fair this year, held on April 5 in Johnson Athletic Center. Organized by Global Education and Career Development (GECD), the fair gives students an opportunity to meet with recruiters, explore career opportunities, and network with companies from a variety of industries. Over 1,000 students (a 24% increase from 2016) and 70 employers attended the event this year.

  • Dr. Heidi Kasevich of the organization Quiet Revolution gave an engaging presentation to MIT students on February 27 about the strengths that introverts can bring to organizations. Kasevich is a self-described “extreme introvert,” and yet her presentation style could almost be described as effervescent. She is a colleague of Susan Cain, the New York Times best-selling author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking.

    Kasevich first spoke about the misconceptions regarding introverts and how society is slowly changing the way we view quiet individuals. A key point of her talk addressed the importance of having introverts recognize their own strengths and dispel the negative adjectives that often accompany the word “introvert.” She also discussed the importance of educating extroverts, so that they understand why introverts behave the way they do.

    Kasevich gave pointers to introverts to help them change the perception about them so they are not misunderstood. One example she gave was regarding body language. Introverts do not always outwardly display their enthusiasm; this may be due, in part, to the inward-focus of introverts, who tend to spend their time analyzing rather than focusing on their outward societal interactions. Kasevich strongly suggested that introverts make an effort to show enthusiasm, so others don’t misread facial cues as indicating disinterest...

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