Career Development News - 2017

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  • Dr. Heidi Kasevich of the organization Quiet Revolution gave an engaging presentation to MIT students on February 27 about the strengths that introverts can bring to organizations. Kasevich is a self-described “extreme introvert,” and yet her presentation style could almost be described as effervescent. She is a colleague of Susan Cain, the New York Times best-selling author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking.

    Kasevich first spoke about the misconceptions regarding introverts and how society is slowly changing the way we view quiet individuals. A key point of her talk addressed the importance of having introverts recognize their own strengths and dispel the negative adjectives that often accompany the word “introvert.” She also discussed the importance of educating extroverts, so that they understand why introverts behave the way they do.

    Kasevich gave pointers to introverts to help them change the perception about them so they are not misunderstood. One example she gave was regarding body language. Introverts do not always outwardly display their enthusiasm; this may be due, in part, to the inward-focus of introverts, who tend to spend their time analyzing rather than focusing on their outward societal interactions. Kasevich strongly suggested that introverts make an effort to show enthusiasm, so others don’t misread facial cues as indicating disinterest...

  • “Make it Happen” was the theme of MIT’s Spring Career Fair this year, held on April 5 in Johnson Athletic Center. Organized by Global Education and Career Development (GECD), the fair gives students an opportunity to meet with recruiters, explore career opportunities, and network with companies from a variety of industries. Over 1,000 students (a 24% increase from 2016) and 70 employers attended the event this year.

  • In January, the Prehealth Advising Office at GECD offered a new one-week, non-credit course: Exploring Public Health through the Lens of Endometriosis. Endometriosis is a serious gynecologic disease that affects one in 10 women, many of whom endure years of painful symptoms before being properly diagnosed and treated. The course attracted 35 participants, including students and members of the broader MIT community, who had the opportunity to learn about this often misunderstood condition.

    The course began with a screening of the documentary film Endo What?, which gave an overview of the health issues posed by endometriosis and the many challenges faced by women who have this disease. On the second day, there was a lecture on public health disciplines and the analysis of endometriosis from epidemiological, health policy, social science, environmental health, and biostatistics perspectives.

    Dr. Malcolm Mackenzie, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School, presented on the third day about surgical methods for treating endometriosis and his approach to interviewing patients. A panel of adolescent and adult patients with endometriosis detailed their first-person experiences on the fourth day, and the week culminated with a presentation by a representative from the patient advocacy organization Endometriosis Foundation of America (EFA). Course participants then had the opportunity to engage in public service work by traveling to Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School and using the EFA’s “Endo EduKit” to educate health science students...